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Strong Performances in New York and Boston for Ocean State Men

In the last track weekend of January, the men of Ocean State AC divided to compete on Friday evening and Saturday at the BU John Thomas Terrier Classic, in Boston, and on Saturday at the Columbia Challenge, at the Armory in New York City.

On Friday night in Boston, Jordan competed in one of the invitational sections of the men’s 3k. Despite pre-race drama surrounding the lack of a pacemaker, some last-minute help from letsrun.com (http://www.letsrun.com/forum/flat_read.php?thread=8643650&page=1) in support of their athlete, Ben de Haan, helped the athletes attract US Army man Robert Cheseret for the job. When the gun went off, Jordan sat in immediately behind the rabbit; by a mile, they were alone, and when the rabbit stepped off the track, Jordan continued on strong to finish in a new personal best of 7:52.45. He will pace the mile at the New Balance Indoor Grand Prix on February 10, and his next race will be the Armagh Road Race on February 15.

Saturday in Boston, Kevin Cooper competed in the fifth section of the 3k. In the face of pre-race disrespect from an unnamed teammate, Cooper’s first crack at the 3k in an Ocean State vest proved fruitful, posting a mark of 8:24.20, his best time in the event since returning to the track two years ago. Cooper was conservative at the beginning of the race, going through the mile towards the back of a strung-out pack, but as the race progressed, so did he, moving into fourth place with a final 400m of 62 seconds! Cooper will compete next in the mile at the BU Valentine Invitational in two weeks.

In New York on Saturday afternoon, Julian posted perhaps the most impressive result of the weekend against world-class field of professional and collegiate athletes. The pace was pedestrian early on– Julian came through 809 meters with the middle of the field in 2:03– but furious over the last 800m of the race. Nonetheless, against the likes of British Olympic finalist Charlie Grice, and 3:35 man Patrick Casey, Julian blazed to a second-place finish in a time of 3:57.45, with a final 400m under 56 seconds. The only man to best Julian was Craig Engels of the Nike Oregon Project, who sports a 3:35 1500m PB and finished fourth at the US Championships in 2017 after his senior year of college. Despite finishing just short of the standard for the Commonwealth games, Julian continues to demonstrate incredibly strong form, which he will test next in the 3k at the Millrose games on February 3.

Upcoming Races

Julian Oakley – Millrose Games, 3k: February 3

Kevin Cooper – Valentine Invitational, TBD: February 10

Jordan Mann and Hugh Armstrong – Armagh Road Race, Road 5k: February 15

 

OSAC Dominant at USATF New England Championships

USATF NE CROSS COUNTRY CHAMPIONSHIPS

On Sunday Nov. 5, the Ocean State Athletic Club competed in the USATF New England Cross Country Championships at Franklin Park in Boston, Mass. The club posted a perfect score of 15 points to win the USATF-NE title. With the win, the club moved to 3-for-3 in USATF-NE competitions.

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Julian Oakley, Shane Quinn, and Jordan Mann (L-R) leading the field early on.

Ocean State established a dominant presence from the beginning of the race, with Shane Quinn and Julian Oakley setting the pace from the start. With Hugh Armstrong, Jordan Mann and Trevor Crawley also a part of the lead pack, OSAC was primed for a low score. The lead pack passed through the halfway mark in around 15:45.

At Coach Ray Treacy’s instruction, the pace began to ratchet up as the group entered into the Wilderness section for the second time. The field quickly began to string out as the team continued to push the tempo over the second half of the race.  Julian Oakley, the team’s top runner in the BAA Mayor’s Cup 8k two weeks prior, pulled away over the final 2,000 meters to finish first, completing the 10k course in 30 minutes and 25 seconds. Fellow Rhode Islander, NE Distance’s Henry Sterling  would finish a distance second to Oakley but, as his team had fewer than five finishers, his place did not count towards team scoring. Jordan was next across the line in third (30:45), followed closely by Trevor (fifth, 30:49), Hugh (sixth, 30:51) and Shane (seventh, 30:53).

Stephen Robertson and Kevin Cooper were the sixth and seventh finishers on the day for OSAC. Robertson was 10th in 31:24, while Cooper was 28th in 32:43.

Full Results: http://www.usatfne.org/cross/results/17-11-05-ne.html 

BOSTON MAYOR’S CUP CROSS COUNTRY

Two weeks prior, on Sunday, Oct. 22,  the New Balance Ocean State Athletic Club competed in the BAA Mayor’s Cup at Franklin Park in Boston, Mass.  The race marked the club’s second team performance and second team win in a USATF New England competition.

Led by an impressive third-place finish from Julian Oakley, who completed the 8k cross country course in a blazing 23:57, OSAC won the event with 25 points, 47 points ahead of the second-place team. The club placed all five of its scoring runners in the top 15 of the race. Jordan Mann was the second club member to finish, as he took seventh overall with a time of 24:29. Shane Quinn also finished in the top ten as he took ninth place with a time of 24:42. Hugh Armstrong and Trevor Crawley rounded out the team scoring for OSAC as they took 13th (24:52) and 15th (24:58), respectively.

Full Results: http://coolrunning.com/results/17/ma/Oct22_Mayors_set1.shtml

Other news from the month of October includes:

Hugh Armstrong made his debut in the half marathon with a top five finish at the Hartford Half Marathon. Armstrong ran the 13.1 miles in an impressive time of 1 hour, 6 minutes and 54 seconds despite developing a stitch in mile 8. He expects to run even stronger in his next attempt at the distance. 

Julian Oakley and Shane Quinn posted a 1-2 finish at the Molly Huddle Fall-Comers 5k XC, opening up the cross country season with strong performances. 

Jordan Mann competed in Japan as part of the Ivy Select team in the Izumo Ekiden against some of the top collegiate competition in Japan. The team posted a top-10 finish, coming in behind a strong anchor leg from Ben Rainero, who completed his 10.2 kilometer leg faster than all but two competitors in the race. 

Year-in-Review: Call me a Pro (Insights)

Year-in-Review

Well, my first year of post-collegiate running is officially in the books. Full of electric highs and disappointing lows, of thrilling victory and crushing defeat, my first year as a professional runner proved nothing short of sensational. This series of blogs will detail the highs, lows, and the final takeaways of my first year as a professional runner.

Three key Takeaways from the Year

Plan

You’d think I hadn’t really learned this considering the number of near-mishaps Julian and I experienced in Europe, but my first takeaway from this year is the need to meticulously plan travel trips. As you may have read in my post about Tallahassee, exceptionally poor planning once cost me not only the chance to maximize my ability in a race, but also about half of my meager monthly paycheck as a graduate assistant at Providence.

From that point on, I resolved to plan my future trips as far in advance as possible, with the maximum level of flexibility I could afford, in order to give myself the greatest chance of success. Soon after Tallahassee, I booked Southwest flights for my California trip. Buying these tickets five months early both saved me money and allowed me the flexibility if something happened, like an injury or a change in my race schedule. Especially for an athlete who doesn’t have an individual salaried contract, who’s ballin on a budget in every sense of the phrase, clear planning and flexibility will help me successfully both make the most of my money and my running. While the trip to Europe certainly had a few near-disasters (though I honestly think that Aer Lingus or Google Flights both had to be somehow at fault for the 6 AM/PM flight mishap, and Europcar closing at 4 PM is clearly a cultural inconsistency, but I digress), our planning of the trip contributed instrumentally to our success, and we’ll be back to do even better next year!

Be Selfish

In the fall, when I’d taken on too many responsibilities in too many places, I spoke to Ray not long after I’d posted this blog. Looking back at the schedule, it really was something ridiculous, but my overconfidence at the time caused me to shrug off Ray’s warnings: if I could get to bed by 9:30 PM, it didn’t matter how impossibly busy I made myself during the day, right? Obviously, I was wrong, and while I should have taken greater heed of his words at the time, one piece of advice Ray gave me during that conversation stands out in retrospect as I contemplate how to further my success on the track— “you have to be selfish.”

Of course, this doesn’t mean I need to start mistreating my friends or stealing my roommate’s ice cream or anything like that, but it does call for me to make decisions conducive to my success in running even when they conflict with social temptations or opportunities to devote my time to other people. Any time I’m not running, eating, or working at whichever job that allows me the financial flexibility to continue to pursue this dream on the track, I can be resting, and I should probably consider that anytime I find myself partaking in the frivolity of normal 24 year-old life.

Or, y’know, something like that. That last paragraph is probably a bit dramatic, to be honest, because if I didn’t have a social life or other interests and hobbies, I would probably get far too bored, too obsessive, and too swept up in the pressure of running to actually have success. Nonetheless, I need to construct my social life and the activities in it around my athletic schedule, and I can’t afford to donate too much of my time to anyone that can’t make it equally worthwhile for me. And of course, I can’t devote too much time to dating, either (See February or March). I’ll still have my fair share of fun, do my fair share of dancing, and eat my fair share of bananas foster waffles, especially in the fall, but when it comes down to it, my decisions will have to serve the best interests of my running before they serve anyone else. This whole thing would be a complete and total waste of my own, Ray’s, and the time of the people who support me otherwise.

Professional Runner

Over the course of the year, I haven’t really known how to refer to myself when explaining to people what I’m doing with my life. At first, I told people I was a postcollegiate runner, finishing off his graduate degree while chasing a few fast times. This probably made sense at the time, considering I was in the midst of a pretty crap fall season and running in an old saucony singlet that had “AC Don’t Test Me” and “Shoes Pls” scrawled in black sharpie on the front and back of my kit, respectively.

By the end of February, my identity had rightfully evolved. I’d demonstrated a bit more fitness, laying down another 7:58 in the 3k; I’d just flown, or rather, I’d been flown by the meet director, to an all-expenses paid race in Northern Ireland, where I’d finished in the top 10 of a relatively elite field, and Shane and I had self-designed team singlets that actually had our club name printed on our new team crest on the top left chest. After all that, Ben Sutherland told me, “the correct designation is probably semi-pro.” And like a probably underrated Will Ferrell movie, it stuck for the next few months: no, I can’t pay the bills through running, but I do get some pretty cool stuff from the whole endeavor.

Then, Letterkenny happened. And I’m like, semi-pro? Forget that. Yes, I still gotta work a part-time job to keep the lights on; yes, my club’s newly official partnership with New Balance basically consists of some shoes and gear I split with my teammates; yes, you will still see local events and crowdfunding from me when I get ready to try and fund another year of traveling around the world for races— but I am a professional runner. At Letterkenny, I looked down the list of dudes I’ve beaten this year and saw a bunch of guys with shoe companies funding their lives, dudes who have run sub 7:50 on the flat and dudes who have run 8:31. I looked around me at races and saw former All-Americans, Olympians, and world champions that I could never dream of beating. And then there’s this photo:

look back at it

That’s the last water jump in the prelim at USAs. While the top guys were far from all out, and while I did finish last out of everyone in the foreground of this photo, none of that really matters. Four years ago, it would have felt like a fantasy for Donn Cabral, already an olympian, to give me me a concerned look back 150m from the finish in the prelim at USAs. This year, it happened, was documented, and I came out wanting more. For 15 minutes, I had a better-than-50 percent chance of making the USATF Steeplechase final, and next year, I’m out there to make the final and perform well in it.

It doesn’t take a genius to look at my current PRs and progression over the last few years and predict my ambitious goals for the next few seasons. I’ve never been one to set unreasonable goals for myself, so I expect to pursue them wholeheartedly and make an honest step towards the next level of track.

While I still stand by my claim that all of this is a bit arbitrary anyway: I love track and have enjoyed my success, but it doesn’t define me— there’s nothing especially more noble about competing at my level than there is being a kid who works incredibly hard in an attempt to make the varsity team at his high school. But still, it is kind of cool to wake up and think, I’m a professional runner. I’m out here doing it. And I can’t wait for more.